Pattaya Daily News

14 March 2011 :: 14:03:51 pm 51503

The World Lends Japan A Helping Hand

Numerous mammoth rescue teams, including warships, doctors and dogs from around the world arrived in Japan on Sunday – all in an international effort to bring relief to Friday’s quake/tsunami-ravaged areas.
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69 countries reach out help Japan, including the United States, the United Kingdom, China and South Korea, according to Kyodo News Agency.

Aid groups such as the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies target their rescuing on the some of the most affected areas including Sendai, Narita, Asahi and Tokyo. Mercy Corps International along with Peace Winds Japan also offered aids to ravaged areas.

A team of 10 members from Doctors Without Borders arrived in the area to assist “in the massive government-led relief effort”. The group will divide into two groups on Monday and expand its reach.

The group said it is “closely monitoring the situation around the Fukushima nuclear power plants.” But it warned, “In the event of a serious nuclear incident, it is only the Japanese government that will be in a position to react.”

The U.S. response effort includes supplies, several warships, search-and-rescue teams, radiation-contamination specialists and two officials from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission with expertise in nuclear reactors.

U.S. Ambassador to Japan, John Roos, said that urban search-and-rescue teams, including about 150 personnel and 12 canines trained to detect live victims, has arrived in Japan on Sunday.

Los Angeles Fire Department Inspector, Don Kunitomi summarized his experience “It looks like it’ll be part Katrina because of the flooding and part New Zealand because of the earthquake,” Kunitomi said, referring to Hurricane Katrina in 2005 and last year’s earthquake in New Zealand. He also noted lessons the search-and-rescue team had learned in Haiti.

The Xinhua news agency confirmed that a 15-member team from China has arrived on Sunday, as they searched for survivors. The team brought along four tons of equipment and material used for the search as well as the provide power and telecommunications to areas that have temporarily lost services due to the quake.

The British government also sent over their rescue forces, including 63 fire service search-and-rescue specialists, two dogs and a medical support team, the UK foreign office said on Sunday.

The teams brought with them 11 tons of rescue equipment, including heavy lifting and cutting equipment to extract people trapped in debris.

South Korea said it was sending two rescue dogs, two handlers and three assistants to carry out what are expected to be dramatic searches of people inside collapsed structures.

The International Atomic Energy Agency’s Incident and Emergency Centre has offered technical assistance to Japan in the wake of an explosion at the Fukushima Daiichi plant.

The government has evacuated more than 200,000 residents from homes close to the plant and tested 160 people for radiation exposure, authorities said Sunday.

Report by : CNN

Photo : Internet   Category : World News

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