Pattaya Daily News

26 October 2009 :: 14:10:58 pm 8568

Unrepentant Canadian Paedophile Admits He Represents An Ongoing Threat

Pattaya, October 26, [PDN]: Ambiguity surrounds a Canadian paedophile’s possible extradition to Thailand over Asian child-sex offences. A Canadian teacher, accused of paedophilia in both Thailand and Cambodia, is currently being held in custody in British Columbia, awaiting possible extradition to face trial in Thailand. The accused is a known associate of another convicted Canadian paedophile, Christopher Neil, both of whom preyed on young boys in Pattaya.
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Following a worldwide manhunt, the accused, Orville Frank Mader, 54, originally from Kitchener, who had fled Thailand in 2007 after child-sex allegations were made against him, was tracked down and arrested at Vancouver International Airport in November, 2007.

However, he was later released and has since been living freely in Canada for the last two years. Mader made a brief court appearance in Abbotsford Court. B.C. on October 21, 2009, and was detained awaiting a forthcoming 5-day court hearing. He is likely to be held under a peace bond, as opposed to being detained on sex-tourism offences. In his hearing on Wednesday, he admitted that he constituted a threat. According to Crown Prosecutor Wendy Van Tongeren Harvey, “He admitted that police had reasonable grounds to be in fear.” It has been proposed that Mader should undertake a year’s therapy.

If found guilty, this will be Mader’s second child-sex conviction; in 2007, he was also convicted in absentia for debauchery for molesting two boys under the age of 13 in 2004 Cambodia in while working as a teacher in Japan. He received a 15-year sentence, but has for obvious reasons never returned there.

However, Mader has applied for bail in Canada and can also apply early to terminate the court order against him if a psychiatrist determines there’s nothing wrong with him.

Canada has procedures in place whereby offenders who commit child-sex offences abroad can be prosecuted there under sex-tourism laws. Ms Van Tongeren Harvey said, however, that unless new evidence is presented against Mr. Mader, it’s very unlikely the peace bond would be renewed against him when the year expires. Certain critics are not exactly satisfied with the court ruling, however. One, Benjamin Perrin, Assistant Professor at the University of B.C. School of Law, is reported to have said that the Mader case is an astounding example of the Canadian justice system’s failure to deal with a possible threat. “Canadian authorities need to do more to protect children from sexual exploitation. Because it’s not just foreign children we’re concerned about here. Now we have an individual who is here at large in Canada, alleged to have committed sex crimes abroad and has now admitted that there are reasonable grounds to fear he will commit (an offence.)”

For the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP), Constable Rosiane Racine, with the Integrated Child Exploitation Unit, said the RCMP are considering the many different options available in terms of laying possible charges.

The most obvious course of action is extradition to Thailand as there is an extant mutual extradition treaty between the two countries. Thai police are eager that Mader should be sent back to Thailand to face the child-sex charges against him. However, the Thai police are concerned that this may not happen. Police Colonel Apichart Suribunya informed Reuters that “Our concern is Canadian police may only be able to hold him for a short period because he apparently has not done anything wrong in Canada.” An arrest warrant was taken out for Mader over the alleged kidnap and sexual abuse of a 7-year old boy in Pattaya. It is alleged that the boy told police Mader had asked him to perform oral sex on him at a Pattaya hotel. Mader, according to Thai police is also being investigated for the sexual abuse of three boys aged between seven and nine in Pattaya and if convicted could face a 20-year prison sentence.

Thai Police are apparently certain that Mader and the other recently convicted Canadian paedophile, Christopher Neil, had some mutual connections in Pattaya and were known to frequent the same hotel in the city. Christopher Paul Neil, the ‘swirly face’ child-sex offender, was jailed in August 2008 on the first of two offences, receiving a prison sentence of 3 years and 3 months, reduced by half for pleading guilty. He was also ordered to pay Bt60,000 to the family of the victim as compensation.

Both men were teachers, prompting calls from some Thai police officials for more thorough background checks on foreign teachers.

“It shouldn’t be enough to wear white shirts and have a university degree. We need to know their background,” police Col. Apichart Suribunya, head of Thailand’s liaison office for Interpol, reportedly told the Associated Press.

Reporter : PDN staff   Photo : Internet   Category : Crime News

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